Howdy, folks.

Let’s discuss the people who spread the edges of “The Old Dominion” and founded counties and states on the frontier. Opequon 1730-1771, Abingdon 1772-1783, Seymour 1783-1796, Bronston 1797-1832, Gosport 1833-1841.

11 February 2013 ~ 0 Comments

Adopt a patriot

Adopt a Purple Heart Veteran of the Battle of Kings Mountain. Click here to learn why-Kings Mountain Purple Hearts Then click the contact us tab to get the who, when, where, and how.

07 January 2013 ~ 0 Comments

Pipes and drums

were part of some battles. I find no drummer, but some fifers on 07Oct1780. Fifer was alternately spelled Phifer in the German settlements. Phifer’s Mill was was a York District SC landmark. Martin and Caleb Fifer were officers in other engagements, though not in the Battle at Kings Mountain. They commanded some of the patriots […]

06 December 2012 ~ 4 Comments

War of Revolution, act of June 1832 for service pensions

Merry man Webster: A pension declaration is a poorly written, often illegible, document with phonetic misspelling of misprounounced improper words and nicknames by old illiterate soldiers with faded memories, often misfiled by DC clerks, degraded and with pieces lost over time. Somewhere a soldier and a widow carefully preserved a very legible discharge certificate. With […]

11 November 2012 ~ 4 Comments


The Scottish bagpipes added to the fife and drums of some orderly and established military units on both the Whig and Tory sides. The 1780 over moutain clans were not that organized. The plaids of the clans and the bagpipes are traditions which survived in the Appalachians. Gatherings for “Highland Games” are still annual events […]

30 October 2012 ~ 2 Comments

Johnny has gone for a soldier

The auld Irish melody “Buttermilk Hill” was sung beside cradles through the centuries. The words varied with mood and season. Sell her flocks and sell her wheel to buy her love a sword to wield. Then to the streets to beg for bread. Elizabeth Colville Black Newell sent two sons, a brother, a nephew, three […]

29 August 2012 ~ 1 Comment

Give me liberty or give me death!

Who first said “Give me liberty or give me death?” Perhaps Patrick Henry’s three sisters whose husbands signed the Fincastle Resolutions Jan 29, 1775. Governor Henry paraphrased their last line.